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So, You Think You're Pregnant
So, You Think You're Pregnant
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So, You Think You're Pregnant

Youth

It is important to talk to an adult you trust when you think you are pregnant. It is also a good idea to do a pregnancy test when you think you are pregnant. These tests are available from a family planning clinic or a pharmacy. Do talk to a trusted adult and / or your partner when you do a pregnancy test. It is also a good idea to visit a family planning clinic to get advice on pregnancy and contraception.

Abstinence, meaning not having sex, is the best way to prevent unintended pregnancy or STI’s, including HIV. If you do have sex, always use contraception and a condom.

Parents

Many people hear myths and misconceptions about how their bodies work, including ways a person can and cannot become pregnant, so it’s important young people have medically accurate information about their bodies and how pregnancy happens. Additionally, knowing the correct anatomical terms for body parts can help young people understand pregnancy and reproduction, set boundaries with other people and effectively communicate with their parents/guardians and health care providers.

Parents can talk with their children about puberty, including how the testicles begin to produce sperm and how the ovaries begin to release an egg about once a month. Young people should understand that going through puberty means that if they were to have unprotected penile-vaginal intercourse, they could now get pregnant or cause a pregnancy.

When young people have an understanding of puberty and basic reproductive anatomy, parents or guardians can explain that penile-vaginal intercourse is when an erect penis is placed in a vagina. If the penis releases semen (a process called ejaculation) in the vagina or on the vaginal opening, and the ovary has released an egg, then a single sperm in the semen could unite with an egg and begin the process of reproduction. The fertilized egg would then implant inside of the uterus to begin a pregnancy. If a pregnancy does not occur, the uterine lining is shed about once a month during a process called menstruation.

Talking to your children about puberty and reproduction is an important part of having them understand their bodies. This lays the foundation for them to know the facts about reproduction and preventing pregnancy before they become sexually active with a partner.

CONVERSATION STARTERS

When parents or guardians start talking with young people about how pregnancy does and doesn’t occur and how to prevent it, before their children become sexually active, young people know they can come to their parents if and when they have questions. You may choose to bring up pregnancy when a friend, relative or a character on a TV show becomes pregnant, or while at a drugstore picking up menstrual products. Below are some ways to start these conversations:

 

Educators

Many people hear myths and misconceptions about how their bodies work, including ways a person can and cannot become pregnant, so it’s important young people have medically accurate information about their bodies and how pregnancy happens. Additionally, knowing the correct anatomical terms for body parts can help young people understand pregnancy and reproduction, set boundaries with other people and effectively communicate with health care providers.

Young people should understand puberty, including how the testicles begin to produce sperm and how the ovaries begin to release an egg about once a month, and that going through puberty means that they can now get pregnant or cause a pregnancy.

Young people should have an understanding of puberty, basic reproductive anatomy and that penile-vaginal intercourse is when an erect penis is placed in a vagina. If the penis releases semen (a process called ejaculation) in the vagina or on the vaginal opening and the ovary has released an egg (called ovulation), a single sperm in the semen can unite with the egg to begin the process of reproduction. The fertilized egg may implant inside of the uterus to begin a pregnancy. If a pregnancy does not occur, the uterine lining is shed about once a month during menstruation.

Educating young people about puberty and reproduction is an important part of having them understand their bodies. This lays the foundation for them to know the facts about reproduction and preventing pregnancy before they become sexually active with a partner.

Q&A

After watching the video with your class, process it using the following discussion questions:
  • What are some methods of contraception that you learned about in this video?
  • What methods prevent pregnancy and which ones reduce the risk of HIV and STIs?
  • What is the most effective way for someone to prevent pregnancy if they are not ready or don’t want to be a parent?
  • Where could you get more information if you still have questions about pregnancy and reproduction?